The Magickal Baobab Tree

By Isabella @The WandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

Now, for something a little different.  Most of us won’t have a Baobab [Adansonia] tree growing in our back gardens unless, of course, we live in say, Madagascar, Australia, the African mainland, or the Arabian Peninsula.  The Baobab tree can live up to 3,000 years and grows quite huge  reaching heights of 5 to 30 m [16 to 98 ft] and have trunk diameters of 7 to 11 m [23 to 36 ft]. The Baobab trees in the southern part of Africa began dying off the early part of this century with the cause not certain, however, it is strongly believed that pesticides and/or dehydration from Global Heating are a determining factor.  Of course, pests could also be to blame, but I’m sure the former two are as much to blame.

Magickal

baobab-trees-Grandidier-Avenue-of-the-Baobabs
Baobab trees ~ Encyclopaedia Brittanica

It is said that gazing at a Baobab tree can invoke an ancient feeling; that perhaps it is bringing back a past life memory or a genetic one.  As someone who is used to receiving both kinds, it can be difficult to discern which it is.   I can imagine though, as a many-greats granddaughter of Mitochondrial Eve, who left Kenya some 150,000 to 200,000 years ago and travelled through the Sudan [or, her closest descendants did] en route to Turkey, then Italy and places further abroad until they ended up in Britain, that the picture of a Baobab tree merely conjures the genetic memory.  Regardless of what memory it gives us, you only need look to see that the Baobab has a very ancient, otherworldly feel to it.  The Baobab is brilliant for helping us connect with our past lives. A good way to do this is to imagine and meditate upon the Baobab. Allow yourself to be taken to a different world – perhaps your own or an ancestor’s.

Another interesting feature of the Baobab is that it almost appears upside-down.  Funnily enough, there are local [to the tree] legends regarding the tree falling from the Divine Plane and the top half becoming stuck in the earth whilst the roots stuck out above.  Kind of gives new meaning to “As above, so below”.  Or, did that come from the Baobab? Perhaps we should meditate on that one.

baobabpowder_1280px_f8fdb1fbf7174420a398220723af9e00
Boabab powder ~ nuts.com

We can’t all have a Baobab tree, but we can have parts of one to work with.  You can buy the fruit [aka, monkey bread] of the tree. Well, I mean, the powder that comes from the fruit.  It is useful in a variety of ways.  You can buy the powder from BuyWholeFoodsOnline.co.uk or if you’re in the US, TerraSoul Foods.  I do have to say, the US pays a lot more for this stuff than the UK! Even with the currency exchange being rather low, it is a good bit more highly priced than in the UK. Still, I think it is worth the money and I will highlight some of the best reasons under Health, shortly. 

But we’re still thinking on the magickal ways in which to use Baobab. One way I like to use the powder, aside from using in food or drink for health, is to put a small amount of Baobab powder into a bowl on your altar whilst doing any kind of past life or ancestral spell work.  If you worship the African Gods or Goddesses, you might like to leave a bowl of Baobab powder on their altar, dedicated to them and if you can get them, Baobab flowers would also go down a treat.

There is one thing you would never get to do is build a wand from Baobab. Injuring the tree in any way is a sacrilege to the Orishas/Gods and terrible punishment would rain down upon the offender.  If you cut one down, it would leave the residing tree spirit homeless, and the spirit would seek revenge. In some communities, people won’t dare pick a leaf or collect dead, fallen wood which may cause an immediate sentence of death.  If this sounds a little familiar, we of any Celtic or Gaelic pagan beliefs know that certain trees must not be cut without certainty of punishment to ensue.

If you want to learn more about this stunning and majestic tree, please visit Chief Yagbe Awolowo Onilu.  Nothing better than learning from one whom has lived with Baobab all his life!

Corresponces

Planet: Earth

Element: Divine Spirit

Gender:  Masculine  and Feminine

Powers:  Ancient Awareness, Divine Communication and Blessings, Generosity, Grounding and Earth Wisdom, Knowledge, Natural Abundance, Spiritual Power, Sustenance, Transitioning to and from the Spirit World, Travel

Deity: Osanyin, Aja [Goddess], Oko, Ososhi

Sabbat: Mabon

Folk Names: monkey bread tree

Health

The guts of the baobab fruit.
Baobab fruit, inside the shell ~ photo by Annabel Hughes

The shell of the Baobab fruit bakes in the sun for about six months, drying on the branch – as a matter of fact, it is the only known fruit that does dry on the branch.  The Baobab is often called “the Tree of Life” and after researching this phenomenal fruit and what it offers, I can certainly see why.

Because of this, the fruit inside the hard shell is naturally dehydrated.  This produces a 100% superfood, extremely high in Vitamin C and other antioxidants.  Is it any wonder that where Baobab grows, even in poorer cultures, that the people there are remarkably healthy? The ones who eat the Baobab fruit, at any rate.

The main, mostly only, way we in other parts of the world who can’t have access to a Baobab tree can at the least purchase the powdered form, which is just as beneficial.  The flavour is said to be very tart and lemony.  If mixing in water for a drink, you can add honey for sweetening.  You can add it to almost anything you eat or drink, if you like a tart, lemony flavour.  I think this would be excellent sprinkled over baked fish!  You could even add it to your cup of tea of a morning.  I don’t know anybody these days who add lemon to their tea… or mint… but, if you were a mind to, Baobab powder would suffice without the sticky mess!  I have also read the powder tastes like sorbet.  Perhaps making a sorbet with the powder in it would be another way of taking it.

However you ingest your Baobab powder, there is a long list of “why you should”.  Firstly, and I’m guessing you’ve cottoned on to this one already is for your immune system.  As you know, the human body does not create nor store Vitamin C, therefore, a nearly endless daily supply is needed to keep one at less risk of colds, not to mention to support our collagen supplies.  A single serving [2-3] teaspoons offers up 33% of our daily Vitamin C requirement! Given that you would need to eat 20 oranges per day to attain your optimal level of Vitamin C, that means you would need to eat 6.33 oranges just to reach 33%!  I love an orange now and again but, flamin’ ‘eck! I would be sick of oranges by that point!

Blood sugar management is another way Baobab fruit helps us. Baobab powder contains 34% soluble fibre, which helps to slow down the release of sugars into the blood stream, reducing energy spikes. Soluble fibre can also help to control blood glucose levels, improve blood cholesterol and reduce visceral fat [body fat that is stored around the organs in your abdomen]. It also helps with the absorption of iron, which many do not know. If you’re short on iron supply and must take supplements, this wonderful powder can help you get the most out of it.

Approximately 40% of people have at least one digestive symptom at any one time [NHS, 2016]. Despite the growing awareness of the role of fibre in improving our digestive health, 80% of people in the UK don’t eat enough of it. Baobab powder is almost 50% fibre. There are two types of fibre that our body needs: soluble and insoluble – and baobab contains both. Soluble fibre dissolves in the water found in your digestive system and can help to reduce the level of cholesterol in your blood.

Prebiotic or gut health. The soluble fibres of Baobab fruit pulp are prebiotics: non-digestible food components that beneficially affect the host by selectively stimulating the growth and activity of beneficial microflora [Journal of Food Research, 2016].  It’s these prebiotic qualities that could explain how Baobab might just be the secret to having the world’s healthiest gut. Studies of the Hadza Tribe in Tanzania, some of the planet’s last remaining hunter gatherers, found they have 40% more diverse gut microbiomes than the average Westerner! “According to scientists, the Hadza have the most diverse gut bacteria of anyone anywhere in the world” [Independent, 2017]. One of their key staples? If you said Baobab, you got it in one! Well done, you!

And, for those of us wanting better skin, younger looking skin? Baobab powder has twice the antioxidants gram per gram of goji berries and more than blueberries and pomegranates combined.

Baobab is packed with antioxidants and vitamin C which supports collagen formation – helping to give you radiant, glowing skin as well as preventing wrinkles.

In fact, baobab’s skin benefits are so impressive that Baobab was the first ever food item to be sold in the beauty halls of the prestigious London department store, Liberty, where it is listed as “must-have” thanks to its exceptional ‘beauty from within’ properties.

There really are loads more reasons why everyone should be eating Baobab in some form or the other [actual fruit or the powder].  It helps balance one’s PH, it defends our bodies from chronic diseases and ailments such as hypertension, arthritis and deficiency in vitamin D.  It can even help with post-workout soreness because of its high vitamin C content.

I hope you have found all this helpful in your magick and for your health.  Many thanks for reading and warmest blessing to all whom this way wander.

Sources

The Magick of Trees, by Tess Whitehurst

Wikipedia.com

Chief Yagbe Awolowo Onilu

NHS

The Independent

Journal of Food Research

The Magickal Crape Myrtle Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

crape thebritishgardner dot com
Pair of Crape Myrtles ~ thebritishgardner.com

The Crape Myrtle [Lagerstroemia indica] tree is native to China and grows well in sandy, chalky, or loamy soil as it must be well-drained. And it likes sun.  In frost-prone areas, grow against a warm, sunny wall, or overwinter in a cool or temperate greenhouse. In warmer climates, grow as specimens, in group plantings, or as a hedge or screen.  I am lucky to live in a so-called warmer climate in the south; therefore, I have at one time had one of these beauties growing on a corner of my rented maisonette some years ago.  Pruned correctly they are magnificently stunning.  The RHS Encyclopaedia of Garden Plants gives it a rating of 2 stars for hardiness meaning it can withstand temperature drops of down to -5 Celsius. If you want to grow one in the north, I imagine it would be best to grow it in a conservatory/green house.  And not that I’m a bit thankful for climate change, but it has contributed to the fact that the gorgeous Crape Myrtle tree is growing better than ever in the UK.

But this fragile-looking tree has staying power.  It has a longevity of up to 50 years if cared for properly and is magickally attributed to good health and longevity of humans in the realms of business, partnerships, and love relationships. There is even a charm for life longevity.

Magickal

As noted above, there is a charm for longevity. Aptly titled the Crape Myrtle Longevity Charm:

lagerstroemia_indica_2448 burncoose dot co dot uk
Crape Myrtle flowers ~ burncoose.co.uk

Lovingly gather a Crape Myrtle blossom.  Tie it in a scrap of muslin along with a Haematite, nine Evergreen needles, and a cat’s naturally shed whisker.  Anoint it with oil of Tea Tree.  Hold it in your right palm and bathe it in sunlight as you say,

For timeless ages, I [they/this will] will joyfully stay

Nine times nine, forever and a day,

Happy, healthy, wealthy, strong,

My [our/this] life’s span is vast and long.

Place your left hand over the charm and cup it in both hands.  Bury it near or under a threshold you regularly cross.  ~ by Tess Whitehurst, The Magic of Trees

For love, plant a Crape Myrtle near your home to ensure your committed relationship stays strong.  This only works if the relationship is to your truest good, otherwise it will speed its dissolution.

A nice, hardy wood which would make a most excellent wand.

Correspondences

Planet:  Saturn [according to Whitehurst, many cite Venus]

Gender:  Feminine

Zodiac:  Capricorn

Element:  Water

Powers:  Business, Love, Longevity, Strength, Stability

Deity:  Venus, Artemis, Aphrodite, Hathor, Astarte, Ashtoreth, Marian

Other Names:  Crepe Myrtle [North America]

Health

Not much can be found.  The stem bark is febrifuge, stimulant, and styptic. The bark, flowers and leaves are hydragog and a drastic purgative. A paste of the flowers is applied externally to cuts and wounds. The root is astringent, detoxicant and diuretic. A decoction of the flowers is used in the treatment of colds.  I have never tried any of this in my practise so use carefully if you do.

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings on all whom this way wander x

Sources

RHS Encyclopaedia of Garden Plants

The Magic of Trees, by Tess Whitehurst

Experience

The Magick of Foxgloves

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

Foxgloves can both ‘raise the dead and kill the living’. The Digitalis purpurea is, as you may suspect from the name, a common heart medication ingredient.  I can remember when many the elder folk in my family spoke of someone on “the digitalis”.  I did not know at the time that the beautiful Foxgloves my Nana raised right outside from where I was sat were the plants responsible for so many lives saved.  Not her personal plants, obviously, but you know…

Still, at the same time, I was cautioned never to touch the stunning flowers, do not pick them. Just “do not”.  For some children that would have been a dare but for me, it was enough.  Not that I was any sainted child, far from it!  But finding that they could kill me in the blink of an eye was quite enough to keep me from doing any more than observing as bumblebees from far and wide came buzzing round and enjoying the nectar.  That was my Nana’s predominant reasoning with me for not messing about with her Foxgloves… the bees!  She knew that despite having been stung once in a tender place – between my little toe and the next – that I loved bees as much as she did.  So, that was a good enough reason for me to leave the Foxgloves alone.

photo from woodlandtrust.org.uk

Foxglove is a well-known plant across the UK, which produces a spike of purple-pink flowers between June and September. It can grow up to 2m tall and is found in heathland, woodland edges, and gardens. Because of its height, I nearly called this a “magickal tree” but then decided it may be closer to wortcunning… then again, we do not ingest this flower in any way [without doctor’s orders]– upon pain of death, literally – so it is simply this… it is Foxglove, purely a treat for the eyes.

Not to be confused with common Comfrey [Symphytum officinale]. Comfrey could be mistaken for Foxglove when not in flower, as the leaves are similar. However, Comfrey leaves are untoothed, meaning they have smooth edges, and Foxglove leaves are toothed. Great Mullein [Verbascum Thapsus] is another plant Foxglove might be confused with when no flowers are present. However, Great Mullein leaves are untoothed and are hairier than those of foxglove.

Foxgloves can be grown in partial shade, shade, and full sun. I have read where those grown in partial shade do not have Digitalis, or at least to a much lesser degree, but the ones raised in full sun are exceedingly poisonous.  I would always wear gloves either way.

Magickal

Plant Foxglove to lure Faeries into your garden.  Dew collected from the blossoms is used in spells for communicating with fairies, though gloves must be worn when handling the plant as Digitalis can be toxic.  Foxglove grown in a garden around your home offers protection to you and your family.  Do not worry about planting Foxglove if you have animals.  They won’t eat it.

Correspondences

Planetary:  Venus

Zodiac:  Taurus

Gender:  Feminine

Element[s]:  Earth, Water

Powers:  Attracting Fae, Death, Healing, Life, Protection

Deity:  Juno, Flora

Other Names:  goblin gloves [Wales], witches’ gloves, dead men’s bells [Scotland], great herb [Ireland], folk’s gloves, foxesglew/fox’s music [Anglo-Saxon]

Health

We have not read the words of Dr Nicholas Culpeper in some time. As we do not endorse using Foxglove medicinally [unless prescribed by your doctor] due to its deadly nature, I shall still give you Culpeper’s take on the medicinal purposes for Foxglove of which he waxes glowingly… only do keep in mind these remedies were written without proper testing back in the 1650’s and earlier. Culpeper’s book was published in 1653.  Read only for amusement, please.

[Government and virtues] The plant is under dominion of Venus, being of a gentle, cleansing nature, and withal, very friendly to nature.  The herb is familiarly and frequently by the Italians to heal any fresh or green wound, the leaves being but bruised and bound thereon; and the juice thereof is also used on old sores, to cleanse, dry, and heal them.  The decoction hereof made up with some sugar or honey, is available to cleanse and purge the body, both upwards and downwards, sometimes of tough phlegm and clammy humours, and to open obstructions of the liver and spleen.  It has been found by experience to be available for the king’s evil [1], the herb bruised and applied or an ointment made with the juice thereof, and so used; and a decoction of two handfuls thereof, with four ounces of Polipody [2], in ale, has been found by late experience to cure divers, of the falling sickness that have been troubled with it above twenty years.  I am confident that an ointment of it is one of the best remedies for a scabby head that is.

I find it quite odd that he never mentions Foxglove as an aid to heart problems. Still, it was still early doors in medicine those days.

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources

[1]  King’s Evil, scrofula https://www.britannica.com/science/kings-evil

[2] Likely referring to the Polypody fern https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/wildlife-explorer/ferns-and-horsetails/common-polypody

Cunningham’s Encyclopaedia of Magical Herbs, by Scott Cunningham

The Complete Herbal and English Physician, by Nicholas Culpeper

Some little experience

Isobel and a kitten [or, Iseabail agus piseag]

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram: @iseabail_witchwriter

iseabail agus piseag

Nana! Nana!”

The woman hard at work in her garden immediately leapt up at the sound of her five-year-old granddaughter’s cry.

“Isobel, are you hurt?!”

“No, Nana, but the wee peeshack is”

Still concerned, but what her granddaughter just said made her laugh a bit as she made her way to from where Isobel’s voice came.  And, as it happens, there was young Isobel with a small grey kitten in her lap.

Nana then burst out with laughter.

“Nana! Wee peeshack is hurt! Don’t laugh!”  At this point, the older woman’s eyes were literally streaming tears as she tried in vain to stifle herself. 

“Let us see, Isobel”, she said as she reached for the kitten.  After a thorough investigation of the young kitty, Nana could find no reason to think it was unhealthy in any way.

“Right, Isobel.  Why is the kitty feeling poorly?”

“Nana, Grandpa calls it ‘wee peeshack’ and said it has a pain in its backside.”

At this point, Nana just sat down on the grass and began shaking all over with laughter.  It was uncontrollable and Isobel feared something bad might come from it.  She placed her hand on Nana’s arm and tried to soothe her. 

Nana finally calmed herself with Isobel’s help. Still smiling broadly, she began to explain to her granddaughter what her Scottish Grandfather was saying and that the kitten was quite healthy and safe.

“Isobel, you know sometimes a sheanair [grandfather, Scottish Gaelic] is grumpy of a morning, yes?”

“Yes, Nana. He is like an old bear you say!”

“Exactly! Well, the kitty got under his feet a bit and in his way, so he said ‘wee piseag [kitten, Scottish Gaelic]  was being a pain in his backside’!”

“Ohh… is grandfather cross with my kitty?”

“No, Isobel.  He is only afraid he may get into a hurry and step on her.  Whenever grandfather is preparing to go out of a morning, it would be best if you keep hold of your kitty so she does not get into his way. 

“Can she sleep in my room, Nana?”

“I would love to say yes, Isobel, but you must remember that your kitten is not fully weaned from her Mummy just yet.  Mummy cat would miss her terribly and baby would not get properly fed.  Let us wait just a while before allowing her to sleep in your room.”

Isobel looked a bit dismal at the prospect of waiting but cheered up.

“Alright, Nana, but please tell Grandfather to stop calling her a peeshack!  Her name is Bridget, your favourite Goddess.”

No Nana could argue with this, now could she?

By Isabella Macy ©2022


Mòran taing [Many thanks] for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

The Magickal Chaste Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

chaste tree amazon co uk
Chaste tree ~ amazon.co.uk

Here is one you don’t think about every day.  The Vitex agnus-castus, or Chaste Tree, is a small shrubby tree from the Mediterranean with distinctive aromatic palmate foliage and elongated inflorescences of fragrant lavender-coloured flowers. It is one of only two species of the genus – the other being Vitex negundo – that can be grown successfully in cool temperate climates, the others all being tropical or subtropical trees.  The Vitex agnus-castus has also been grown in the US since about 1670 after the Great Pilgrim Migration. It seems many tree genus’s which were taken to America in times past have eventually been given new genus names, but the Chaste tree apparently has not been renamed.  The Chaste tree also grows in New Zealand, but its genus is Vitex lucens.

Today we will explore both the magickal and health-related connections of the Chaste tree for our purposes.

Magickal

chaste flowers by tropicalbritain.co.uk
Chaste flowers tropicalbritain.co.uk

The flowers of the Chaste tree attract bees! If you wish to help Mother Nature replenish our quickly diminishing precious resource, the honeybee, feel free to plant all the Chaste trees you like. No, it isn’t magick, but it is good for environment.

chaste-berry saga co uk
Chaste berries ~ saga.co.uk

Apparently, the reason the Chaste tree got her peculiar name is from the story of the festival of Thesmorphia, in honour of the Goddess Demeter, during ancient times.  During this festival sex was forbidden, therefore Athenian women placed Chaste leaves and branches on their beds to dissuade men from making advances upon them.  Similarly, maidens yet without partners wore the flowers to stay chaste.  Curiously though in today’s times, herbal healers employ the use of the Chaste berries to increase fertility and sex drive!  Funnily enough, the anecdotal findings of the use of the herb supports one in balancing one’s sexuality. So, it would seem it may increase where needed as well as slow down when needed… win, win, I suppose!

The berries can be dried and ground into powder for use in loose incenses for fertility magick and sex magick.

Corresponces

Planet: Pluto

Element: Water

Gender:  Feminine

Powers:  Fertility Magick, Goddess Energy, Protection, Sex Magick

Deity: Ceres, Demeter, Persephone

Sabbat: Mabon and Beltane

Folk Names:  Monk’s Pepper, Chaste Berry, Mu Jing, Cloister Pepper

Health

Chaste-Tree-Pure Naturals co uk
by purenaturals.co.uk

Chaste tree contains iridoids, flavonoids, progestins, and essential oils. This combination may help control menstrual cycles and ease menstrual pain. It may treat some endocrine problems.

Chaste tree has been used to treat menstrual cycle problems and pain, premenstrual syndrome, and menopause. Chaste tree berries may help stimulate progesterone. This is a female hormone that rises 2 weeks before menstruation. It may help normalise oestrogen and progesterone.

Chaste tree is claimed to help treat painful breasts [mastodynia]. In European herbalism and medicine, vitex extracts are used for uterine fibroid cysts. They help boost breast milk supply in new mothers. The herb has a long history in balancing hormones. It may help lower the sex drive in people who wish to stay chaste.

Side effects, toxicity, and interactions

D&HGroundChaste hyperdrug co uk
hyperdrug.co.uk

Chaste tree has no serious side effects. Mild side effects can include nausea, stomach issues, diarrhoea, and itchy rash.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not use chaste tree. It isn’t known if chaste tree is safe for children.

This supplement should not be taken by people with hormone-sensitive cancer.

Don’t use chaste tree if you take any medicines, herbs, or other supplements. Check with your healthcare provider or pharmacist first.

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources

The Magic of Trees, by Tess Whitehurst

Wikipedia.com

The Magickal Almond Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

What an interesting tree, the Almond! One of my favourite nuts are Almonds along with Walnuts, Brazil nuts, Pistachio nuts…alright, I’ll stop 😊 Admittedly I could go on a lot longer, but we are here for the lovely Almond tree and what it can do for us magickally.

Ingrid Almond tree growing on the Oxford High Street, UK
An Ingrid Almond tree growing on the Oxford High Street, UK ~ from Pinterest`

In researching the Almond tree [Prunus dulcis], I learned so much I never knew. Firstly, Almonds grow rather prolifically in the US state of California, but the tree is native to the country of Iran and closely surrounding countries. They are also grown in Australia and Spain.  Sounds to me that wherever it is quite warm most of a year, Almond trees will grow.  That is why you won’t catch many growing in the UK unless they are the Ingrid which is the most reliable Almond variety for the UK climate, and will produce well-flavoured Almonds in late August if you can offer it a sunny sheltered situation. The spring blossom is also very attractive – far more so than most fruiting plums and cherries, to which it is closely related.

Another fact about Almonds is that there is a fatally poisonous Almond called the Bitter Almond which is grown in the wild. It is so highly toxic only a small amount is fatal.  Beware of the wild Almonds wherever you reside.

Almonds ripe
Ripe Almonds ~ Google Images

The Almond is a deciduous tree, growing 4–10 m [13–33 ft] in height, with a trunk of up to 30 cm [12 in] in diameter.  The flowers are white to pale pink, 3–5 cm [1–2 in] diameter with five petals, produced singly or in pairs and appearing before the leaves in early spring.  If you’re planning on planting an Almond tree, please do, however, be advised your wait will be a long one until your real first harvest as the trees reach full bearing age five to six years after planting. The fruit matures in the autumn, 7–8 months after flowering. And, the almond fruit is 3.5–6 cm [1 3⁄8–2 3⁄8 in] long. In botanical terms, it is not a nut but a drupe.  Still, I shall always call them nuts, as I only learned they are “drupes” as of today.

You may have heard of Almond gum in spell work.  Badam pisim/Almond gum cannot be prepared.  It comes from the tree. Badam/Almond tree bark secretes the gum which dries up on the bark, then one can collect the gum and clear it of any leftover wood bark to be used in many ways.

Magickal

Keep an Almond in your pocket to help you retrieve lost things and it assists in bringing good luck your way.  Almond oil is often used in prosperity spells by rubbing it on the working candle or a few drops in a loose incense being burned for prosperity; Almond leaves and Almonds proper are also used for money magick. Also, Almond oil can be smeared on money to help attract more money.  As a wand or amulet, the wood of the Almond tree aids in self-protection.  Almond wood is also said to be effective in love magick.

Almonds are also essential to beauty as the drupe [nut] is beneficial to our health, however, I came across this spell in my copy of Tess Whitehurst’s book, The Magic of Trees:

Preheat your oven to 350F [in North America], or at around 180c/160 fan/gas mark 4 in UK/Europe. Thought I should add that as she did not. Centre yourself by holding your hands in a prayer pose and calling upon the Goddess [of your beliefs] to bless your magickal workings.  Place three cups of raw, organic Almonds in a medium to large bowl.  Add a tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of salt and stir in a clockwise direction with a wooden spoon until coated.  As you stir, mentally direct a very bright, pink light through the spoon into the Almonds.  Line a baking tray with aluminium foil or preferably baking parchment and pour the Almonds onto the baking tray, spreading evenly.  Hold open your palms over the Almonds and direct the energy of your words into them as you chant three times:

Goddess of love, Goddess of light

Bless me with your beauty bright

Bake for ten to twelve minutes or until they are a rich, dark brown.  Let cool, then store in a large glass container with sealing lid. Every morning until they’re gone, have one quarter to one third cup Almonds with or for breakfast until they’re gone.  Repeat as desired… or as needed 😊 I would need to eat them forever!

Correspondences

Planet: Jupiter [I have also seen some saying Mercury]

Element: Air

Gender:  Feminine [some say Masculine]

Powers:  Beauty, Clairvoyance, Divination, Fertility, Goddess Energy, Healing, Prosperity, Protection, Wisdom

Deity: Attis, Mercury, Thoth, Hermes

Sabbat: Beltane

Folk Names: None, really

Health

Badam pisim otherwise known as Almond gum has great cooling properties.  In very hot places such as India, where my mother’s very far back ancestors came from, Badam pisim is added to water or any drink to help cool one’s system on a 40c day.  It helps calm the stomach burns, treats ulcers and reduces the burning sensation in the stomach. It is also known for its cholesterol lowering properties.

Health benefits of the Almond nut/drupe:

Almonds bbc good food
Almonds ~ BBC Good Food

Almonds are high in phytic acid, a substance that binds certain minerals and prevents them from being absorbed. Whilst phytic acid is generally considered a healthy antioxidant, it also slightly reduces the amount of iron, zinc and calcium you get from Almonds. They are among the world’s best sources of vitamin E, so good in fact, you can eat these daily and probably no longer need E supplements. Almonds can assist with blood sugar control.  If you are hypoglycaemic or have diabetes, sometimes the blood sugar gets a bit out of whack.  People without diabetes also see major reductions in insulin resistance when supplementing with magnesium. Always keep a container of Almonds [non-sugared!] with you .  They are very high in magnesium therefore you could possibly save money from buying that supplement.  Almonds can lower your cholesterol levels particularly the LDL or bad cholesterol.

Lastly, Almonds can help you in weight loss.  Due to their satiating properties, Almonds [and Walnuts] are a great addition to an effective weight loss diet.  And, they are high in fibre and protein and low in bad carbs. Win-win!

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources

The Magic of Trees, by Tess Whitehurst

Wikipedia.com

The Magickal Acacia Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

Are you ready to climb trees with me again? I am on a journey to write about trees we often don’t have where I live or… possibly we do, and I simply haven’t paid them any mind until now.  I can’t say I’ll be expert at writing on subjects I have not worked with personally, but I feel I can at the least pull together into one blog all the useful information you need to work magick with if you do have access to these.  And now, on the very magickal Acacia tree!

Folklore

Acacia tree
African Acacia tree ~ Google images

Acacia is steeped in lore, particularly from the Egyptians.  The ancient Egyptians made funeral wreathes of Acacia leaves and the Hebrews planted a sprig of evergreen Acacia to mark the grave of a departed friend. Acacia is also revered by the Egyptian gods and goddesses as it is believed the very first gods were born beneath its branches in Heliopolis. The stern of the celestial boat of Ra was made of Acacia wood and it was sacred to the Goddess Isis.

The ancient Egyptians used the Nile Acacia for enlightenment and talking to the gods. Their spiritual guide was not Hathor or Isis, but Osiris. Osiris was the first god to be born from under the Acacia tree, in their beliefs, and all else followed. The legend remains today that the spirit of Osiris is in every Acacia tree on the Nile…nee, all Acacia trees.

Magickal

If you wish to become a spiritual leader, it is believed you should fashion a wand from Acacia wood for it is thought to increase your integrity, authority, and confidence if you so charge it to be; all of which you will need to have to fulfil this role.

You can use Acacia leaves dipped in your homemade holy water to sprinkle your altar or any other items you wish to consecrate.

gum arabic
Gum Arabic ~ photo from Amazon.com

If you wish to communicate with the dead, Acacia leaves burned in a loose incense on a charcoal is effective. This is also an effective way to induce spiritual phenomena and develop personal psychic power by opening your mind; adding Frankincense and Myrrh can be used to intensify the effect.  Acacia leaves are especially powerful when attempting to contact the dead and should be rubbed into white candles but not worn on the body while attempting such work. Acacia symbolises the afterlife.

Acacia is used in spells related to protection and psychic power and the dried gum [gum Arabic from Acacia senegal] is used as a base for many incenses, as well as . Combine with sandalwood to make an incense to aid in meditation. The leaves may also be burned on charcoal to increase personal power and the resin is how most of us use it mixed with loose herbs and woods on a charcoal.

If you are fortunate enough to have an Acacia tree growing near, it is an effective way to have your petitions heard by your god[s] and/or goddess[es].  Many years ago, the famed Charles Darwin came upon an Acacia tree in Patagonia where the village people revered it as a Divine altar.  They would leave offerings beneath it along with their requests.  Perhaps you can find a way to create your own Acacia altar.

Health

Apparently, Acacia is available in supermarkets.  To be fair, I have never gone in search for it to use as a health aid or a food enhancer.  However, Acacia has apparently been used in medicine for a great number of years and I assume, if you know how to use it correctly, it is of great benefit.  However, as always, please see your general practitioner before embarking on any home health remedy. And I do not mean Dr Google.

Acacia is often used in topical treatments to help wounds heal. Doctors, scientists, and researchers believe that this effect may be due to some of its chemicals, such as alkaloids, glycosides, and flavonoids. In one study, a species of acacia known as Acacia caesia was tested on rats as part of a topical wound treatment. It led to quicker wound healing than the standard treatment.

The extract of a species of acacia known as Acacia catechu, sometimes called black khair, can be used in dental products like mouthwash to prevent gingivitis. Powdered Acacia can also be used in a type of herbal toothpaste that’s been shown to clean teeth without being too abrasive to the surface of your teeth. An older study, Trusted Source from 1999 showed that this herbal tooth powder cleaned and cleared well over two-thirds of tooth plaque, and nearly 100 percent in some cases.

Acacia gum contains water-soluble dietary fibres [WSDF] that are not only good fibre for your diet but also helpful in keeping your cholesterol under control. One study showed that taking 15 grams of Acacia gum in liquid form every day helped manage the concentration of plasma cholesterols in blood. Although published in 1992, this is the most comprehensive study on the effects of Acacia gum on the blood to date. WSDF can also help you maintain a healthy weight and is good for general cardiovascular health. The American Food and Drug Administration [FDA] even made changes to regulations to recognise the beneficial use of Acacia as a good fibre source in many popular foods, including cereals, juice, and yoghurt.

Because it’s known to relieve irritation and inflammation, Acacia gum can also help control coughs. The properties of Acacia gum allow it to be used in solutions to coat your throat and protect the mucus in your throat from irritation. Using Acacia for coughs can keep your throat from becoming sore as well as ease or prevent symptoms, including losing your voice. I don’t think I trust sucking on the tiny gum Arabic resins I burn in my censor…

The Acacia greggii plant, found in the United States and Mexico, can be used to help stop blood flow in gashes, wounds, and other surface cuts. Pouring an Acacia-infused tea on cuts is an especially effective remedy. This can be helpful for stopping heavy bleeding and washing bacteria from the cut.

Potential risks

Ask your doctor before consuming any form of Acacia to make sure you won’t have an allergic or drug interaction reaction. Acacia senegal has been found to interact with the efficacy of some medications. For example, it may prevent some antibiotics from being absorbed.

Some forms of Acacia contain toxic chemicals that could cause hair loss, affect your digestive tract’s ability to take in nutrients, and stunt growth. Do not consume a form of Acacia that you’re not familiar with. Also be sure to consult your doctor or an expert before taking any form of Acacia that hasn’t been processed for use in food.

Acacia is often found already processed in foods, but it’s also available in ground, powder, or whole form at your supermarket. The studies above show that anywhere from 15 to 30 grams of Acacia per day is a safe dose but talk to your doctor before giving it to younger children or older adults. They may suggest adjusting dosage to avoid any potential digestive or absorption issues.

Corresponces

Planet: Sun

Element: Air, Spirit

Gender:  Masculine

Powers: Fidelity, Immortality, Psychic Abilities, Protection

Deity: Osiris, Astarte, Ra, Zeus, Isis and Diana

Sabbat: Litha

Folk Names: Cassie Flower, Catechu, Egyptian Thorn, Gum Arabic, Cape Gum

I hope you enjoy the new tree series.  Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources

The Magic of Trees, by Tess Whitehurst

Healthline.com

The Magickal Cinnamon Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

Do Cinnamon trees grow in the UK? Yes!  But to my knowledge, not just anywhere but in Birmingham, West Mids at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens, they do. The Cinnamon tree [Cinnamomum verum – which translates to “true Cinnamon] is native to Sri Lanka, however, in 2016, Indonesia and China produced 75% of the world’s supply of cinnamon. The aromatic spice was once one of the most expensive spices to procure in western countries.  Nowadays you can get a small jar of it for under a pound in some shops. 

Cinnamon Trees by beautifulnow.is

Many people love a sprinkle of Cinnamon over their porridge or toast of a morning. Of course, there are also many kinds of drinks, hot or cold, alcohol based or plain, which benefit from the flavour of a bit of Cinnamon.  And it is used in many kinds of curries and other favourite Indian and Middle Eastern foods we all enjoy. And that Cinnamon stick everyone enjoys in a hot Christmas / Yuletide toddy is the bark of the Cinnamon tree! 

According to the website for Birmingham Botanical Gardens:

To make cinnamon sticks or “quills” the stems have to processed soon after harvesting whilst the stems are still wet. Again, the outer bark is removed, then the stems is hammered evenly to loosen the inner bark, which can be separated into 1 metre long rolls, 0.5mm thick. These are dried in a well ventilated, warm area for 4 to 6 hours before being cut into 5 to 10 cm lengths for sale. The cultivated trees are coppiced or cut back to the ground to encourage new stems. This is done on a two-year cycle so that only two-year-old stems are used. Cinnamon can be used to flavour cakes, biscuits, and other deserts as well as curries, stews, soups, meats and pickles. It is also used in drinks like teas and mulled wine for Christmas.”

At first I had thought of writing about Cinnamon the spice in a Wortcunner’s Cabinet blog, however, the more I thought on it, it seems that is what everyone does, and in most instances leaving out the tree altogether.  We would not have the spice if not for the tree, therefore, the tree itself needs some attention.

So, what makes it magickal?

Magick

Burning the wood or the bark in an incense will bring about high vibrations and it is also a good ingredient to use to stimulate your psychic powers.  It is excellent in loose incense for money drawing purposes.  Carry a stick of Cinnamon bark with a piece of paper and an amount you need in your currency written on a piece of paper wrapped round it and then wrap a low denomination bank note around that and tie a piece of string round to hold it all together.  Keep this in your coin purse, wallet, or anywhere you keep money until you receive the money you need. [You can also do this with a piece of Cedar wood].  Cinnamon bark, wood, spice, or oil are all excellent to use for empowering yourself with healing, love, protection, psychic powers, and success.  They can be used in sachets, spell bags, incenses, and infusions.  I have read of some people anointing their currency with Cinnamon oil with great success. 

Correspondences

Planet:  Sun

Zodiac:  Leo

Gender:  Masculine

Element:  Fire

Powers:  Healing, Love, Lust, Protection, Power, Psychic Power, Spirituality, Success, Wealth

Sabbat[s]:  Imbolc, Litha, Yule

DeityEgyptian: Ra, Sekhmet, Greek: Hephaestus, Hestia, Hindu: Agneya, Agni, Celtic: Aed, Brigit, Norse: Glöð, Logi, Roman: Vesta, Vulcan,

Other Names:  Sweet Wood,

Health

In my home growing up, if you had a toothache [as too many did in those days!], if pure Clove oil weren’t around and you had some pure Cinnamon oil available, it would work nearly as well.  However, pure Cinnamon oil should not be used topically on one’s skin.  Generally speaking, I believe it would just be best to drink your Cinnamon and leave the oils to add to loose incenses or smearing on your bank notes. 

Cinnamon is proven to relieve upset tummies, however, if you are pregnant, it is best not to imbibe Cinnamon at all. Otherwise, Cinnamon tea after a meal is said to regulate your blood sugar and aid in digestion.  Cinnamon is a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory.  It has shown hopeful signs in helping Diabetics by dramatically reducing insulin resistances well as those with heart disease by lowering high blood pressure.  There are studies in effect presently which are looking to prove that Cinnamon may have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

And Cinnamon is also being looked into as a possible candidate for slowing the growth of some cancers, and HIV. 

For a Bit of Fun!

Yule decorations by Wytchencrafts

I try not to be very “sell-y” in my blogs, although I do write the occasional blog flogging our wares.  As many of you know, my daughters and I make witchcraft supplies which we sell online but we also make a range of rustic Yule decorations as well. And, as several items are made from Cinnamon wood as well as Cinnamon bark, I would like to share them at this time, if anyone is interested.  You can click here to visit and see all the items we have to offer. Thank you for the indulgence 🙂

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources

Birmingham Botanical Gardens

Wikapedia.com

The Encyclopaedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham

From the Wortcunner’s Cabinet, Turmeric

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

How-To-Grow-Turmeric-4 balcony gardens
Growing Turmeric ~ photo from Balcony Gardens

For health benefits I pair a half-teaspoonful of Turmeric powder and a dash of black pepper with Ginger root tea.  Perhaps one reason they work so well together is that Turmeric is a member of the Ginger family.  Turmeric [Curcuma longa] is a flowering plant and of course, both Turmeric and Ginger are used for cooking, particularly in the Middle Eastern countries, but Turmeric is also quite magickal.  It has  been long used in Ayurvedic medicine, where it is also known as haridra.  Oh, yes! It can be used as a dye, as well.  In fact, it was originally used as a dye, then found to be a flavoursome food additive, and then was found to be quite medicinal as well.  Always be certain the Turmeric you buy is orange/yellow, not orange/red.  Orange/red could mean impurities were added such as heavy metals, etc.

During the Vedic period in India, Turmeric was known as the ‘’golden spice’’ or the ‘‘spice of life’’ as it was associated with the sun. Significance was attributed to the bright yellow and saffron spice as the sun and sun Gods were a focal point of worship and ritual at the time. The main indigenous uses of Turmeric were rites and rituals intended to produce fertility and spiritual purification.

Magickal

Turmeric has been used in many cultures for increasing fertility in both humans and animals.  Some swear by wearing Turmeric in a charm for good health and protection.  For protective purposes in a ritual circle, Turmeric is sometimes sprinkled within its boundaries.  In Hawaii, Turmeric is mixed with salt and water, then sprinkled in the area wanting purification such as a sick room or even a ritual circle.

Because Turmeric implies a symbol of purity, fertility and prosperity among the Hindus. It is used in  rites and rituals. Turmeric powder along with sandal powder is used in preparing Kalabha to be poured on the presiding deities in temples.

The dried Turmeric roots in Betel leaves called Kumkum are given to the women during the ceremonies as they are considered as a fertility enhancer and bring good luck. Married Hindu women apply this on their forehead longitudinally along the hair partition path to indicate the marital status or smear Turmeric paste on either side of the cheek.  Turmeric paste is applied to the skin of the bride and groom before marriage in some parts of India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where it is believed to make the skin glow and keep harmful bacteria away from the body.

In southern India, the dried rhizome is often worn in an amulet as protection against evil and to bring about healing or good luck.

Correspondences

Planetary: Sun

Gender:  Masculine

Zodiac:  Leo

Element: Fire

Chakra:  Solar Plexus

Powers:  Fertility, Health, Purification, Protection

Deity:  Kaali, Naaga, Vishnu, Durga,  Lord Krishna, Ganesh, Kali [Hindu]

Other Names: Olena [Hawaiian]

Health

Turmeric root by Julie Daniluk
Turmeric root ~ photo by Julie Daniluk

Unfortunately, my go-to for all things herbal and spice, Nicholas Culpeper, has no words of wisdom for Turmeric. Then again, he mainly wrote of what he knew from all over England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales.  There is a good chance he had never tried the spice as it was either not being imported to Great Britain at the time or, if it was, he simply had not the chance to use it.  So, a lot of what you read now will be from my own use Turmeric and the findings I have.

In Ayurveda, the Hindu medicinal system, Turmeric is utilised extensively for its healing and health producing qualities. Spiritually it is used to balance the energies of the body while medicinally it is well known as an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiseptic, digestive, antioxidant and diuretic agent. It is taken internally in the form of juice, tea and powder or applied topically in the form of lotions, ointments and pastes. Milk boiled with Turmeric and sugar is used in India as a cold remedy and the juice of the Turmeric root is often applied to help heal wounds.

My personal recipe to help keep my immune system up, as I had written about in my last blog, From the Wortcunner’s Cabinet – Ginger Root:

1-ounce grated Ginger root , steep covered for ten minutes.  I put my Ginger root in a tea diffuser/basket, but you can also just toss it into the hot water if you don’t mind Ginger bits floating round in your drink.  When ten minutes are up, lift out tea basket and add the following:

½ teaspoon powdered Turmeric

A dash or pinch of black Pepper

Stir very well and keep your spoon for you will need to stir it constantly as all of the Turmeric fails to dissolve in the water but if you stir again after each sip you won’t end up with a quarter teaspoon of Turmeric in the bottom of your cup.  It may sound like a bit of work, but the health benefits are very much worth it. 

So far, so good is all I know… its added health benefit is that because both the Ginger root and the Turmeric are both so very anti-inflammatory, my arthritis pain is all but a dream now.  Hand on heart, drinking two cups of this concoction a day is doing more for my pain than when I was having to take heavy prescription painkillers.

Turmeric is also said to be effective for ailments of the liver, such as jaundice.  Clinical trials have shown it to successfully reduce cholesterol levels.  Studies have shown it is also effective against H. pylori the cause of gastric ulcers.  It has also been found effective in some cancers.  Curcumin, the workhorse in Turmeric, can reduce LDL – or bad cholesterol – which will then prevent blood clotting, while removing arterial plaque build-up.

Turmeric contains phytochemicals and nutrients with several beneficial effects such as protecting body organs from damage, reducing cholesterol levels, improving blood-vessel health, controlling inflammation, combating infection, and more.  So, what isn’t there to love about Turmeric?

Stay healthy.

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings upon all whom this way wander.  Please stay safe x

Sources

The Encyclopaedia of Magical Herbs, by Scott Cunningham

Wikipedia.com

Experience

The Magickal Buckthorn Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

One of the first questions which pop up under ‘People also ask’ if you Google Buckthorn Tree is “Is Buckthorn good for anything?” .  Really? I felt quite indignant! Aren’t all trees good for something, if not multiple things? Maybe having a Druid father makes me feel indignant over that question, however, should you be one of those who might ask this, let me very patiently explain just what the Buckthorn tree is good for… and hopefully the people who do ask that question routinely will find satisfying answers here 😊

Buckthorn Flowers
Buckthorn flowers ~ woodlandtrust.org.uk

The Buckthorn [Rhamnus cathartica] tree is native to countries from the central British Isles south to Morocco, and east to Kyrgyzstan.  It is also native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia.  Mature trees can grow to a height of 10m, with grey-brown bark and spiny branches. The leaf buds are conical and black brown in colour, and form on long stalks. Buckthorn is dioecious, meaning male and female flowers are found on different trees. Flowers are yellow green with four petals and are pollinated by insects.  It is similar to alder buckthorn [Frangula alnus] but purging Buckthorn has opposite leaves and Alder Buckthorn has alternate leaves.

Purging Buckthorn is the main food plant of the brimstone butterfly whose caterpillars eat the leaves. Its flowers provide a source of pollen and nectar for bees and other insects, while its dense growth makes it a valuable nesting site for birds. So, yes, it is good for something, our Buckthorn!

Buckthorn Berrys
Buckthorn berries ~ woodlandtrust.org.uk

However, in many places it seems to take over wherever it lives.  Not only in the UK but mostly in the US where the common Buckthorn lives [brought over by the English back during the Great Pilgrim Migration]  is a bit of a nuisance.  Whilst birds [and sometimes mice] do eat Buckthorn berries, it’s often because it’s the only available seed source. But Buckthorn berries are not a good food source for small birds. They’re low in protein and high in carbohydrates and produce a severe laxative effect in some animals. For smaller birds, the laxative effect can even be strong enough to result in death. Adding insult to injury, the excreting birds also end up distributing the Buckthorn seeds over long distances. And, that means more Buckthorn.

Now you might see why it is called “purging Buckthorn” sometimes…

Let us talk about magickal uses now!

Magickal

Tess Whitehurst, in her book The Magic of Trees, calls the Buckthorn “a Taurus with an Aries rising” because it is a tree which is stubborn enough to see anything through.  Sometimes, in magick, we really need that kind of tenacity!

Buckthorn Seedlings
Buckthorn seedling ~ Treegrowers.co.uk 

It is said that if you wish to de-hoard your home but can’t get the energy up to do so, place a 50p coin [or a 50 cent piece in the US or anywhere else which uses 50 cent coins] at the base of a Buckthorn tree.  Then, ask permission of the Buckthorn tree to snip a branch from it, doing so with love.  Use this branch to purify the air in your home before starting the task of decluttering, moving through each room using an anti-clockwise sweeping motion. When finished, give the branch back to the earth by laying it on the ground.  Start small… clear out one small space, such as a cupboard.  Continue choosing one small space to clear as you feel more up to it until you have de-hoarded every place in your home. And, if it works as well as I think it should, you might well be motivated to clear your home much sooner than you first imagine!

Buckthorn is likewise a good ally in beginning any kind of endeavour, whether a new business, new job, or anything in which you feel you need extra “sticktoitness”.  I would suggest doing the same ritual as above, only “sweeping” yourself with the branch.  I would also snip off a small piece of the Buckthorn branch and use it as a talisman to help you keep motivated but still leave the largest piece of the branch to the earth outdoors as described above.

If beginning any kind of new project, whether for work or school, visit a Buckthorn tree at noon.  Empower a crystal [one which has powers of success is best, such as Citrine] with your intention, holding it in bright sunlight if possible.  Imagine yourself feeling joyful and successful in embarking upon this project, working faithfully until complete.  Imagine your success and the honours it might bestow, and your satisfaction of a job well done.  Empower the crystal with all the confident feelings you have and when you feel this is complete, bury the crystal at the base of the Buckthorn, then pour an entire bottle of red wine around the tree’s roots.  Yes, you can use a cheap bottle 😊

According to Dioscorides, placing branches of Buckthorn around doors and windows drives away all evil sorceries committed toward you.

According to Scott Cunningham, it is wise to carry a piece of Buckthorn with you to all  court and legal matters and as a general good luck generator.

Correspondences

Planetary:  Saturn [Mars, according to Whitehurst]

Zodiac:  Sagittarius

Gender:  Feminine [Masculine, according to Whitehurst]

Element[s]:  Water [Earth, according to Whitehurst]

Powers:  Protection, Exorcism, Wishes, Success, Legal Matters, Strength, Tenacity

Deity:  Ran,  of the Vanir

Other Names: Purging Buckthorn, Common Buckthorn

Healing

Sadly, my go-to for all things herbal/tree/spice related information, Nicholas Culpeper, has no writings of Buckthorn so no words of wisdom from him.  However, I think you may have gotten the idea above that Buckthorn is an effective laxative.

Word of Caution: If you suffer from a bleeding disorder, Buckthorn berry can be dangerous, as it slows down blood clotting. Also, if you already are taking blood pressure medication or suffer from hypotension, this berry might not be a great choice. As always, you should speak with a medical professional before making any major changes to your diet.

That said, the berries of the Buckthorn are thought to be a preventative to many diseases and problems such as aging, anti-cancer, cholesterol, circulation, diabetes control, heart health, stomach problems, vision health and a vitamin C boost.

But please, do not just pluck the berries off from a tree and start eating them.  In a case like this, once you have a thumb’s up from your GP, order a proper supplement from a reputable vitamins and supplements dealer.

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources

Encyclopaedia of Magical Herbs, by Scott Cunningham

The Magic of Trees, by Tess Whitehurst

Woodlandtrust.org.uk