A Beginner’s Understanding of Ogham Divination, Part Seventeen

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram:  @iseabail_witchwriter

Ogham Ohn
Ogham Ohn ~ photo by i.macy

Ohn is the Ogham mark for the needle-bearing, non-conifer tree, Gorse, or Furze, from old Celtic dialect.  Truthfully, Gorse is considered more of a hedge plant than a tree, although they can grow to about 15 feet in height if not pruned back.  Ohn is also the Ogham for the Spring Equinox sabbat of Beltane.  It is not a Celtic Birth Tree Ogham.  Folklore has it that Ohn/Gorse is effective against faerie mischief.

Representations:  Fertility, Hope, Prosperity, and Protection

Ogham Letter:  O

Number:  17

Colour:  Gold, Yellow

Tarot: The Chariot

Animals:  Bees, Cormorant, Hare, Harrier Hawk

Plant:  Heather

Divination Meaning:  When you pull the Ohn Ogham, the question you must ask yourself is, “Where is my journey taking me? How shall I follow my path?”  A hint:  First look at the part of your life you’re in.  Are you young? Middle-aged? Older? When Ohn appears in your reading, it can indicate that you need to examine the direction of your life… maybe you’re about to take a trip; it can indicate emotional journeys such as changes of mind or heart. And, Ohn can also indicate if you need to make a spiritual journey such as meeting with ancestors in the Otherworld or finally meeting your Spirit Guardian.  Use your intuition to know where your journey lies. If you are to embark on a physical journey, Ohn is a magick amulet for you as physical protection; it is also well to have on hand for spiritual and emotional journeys.

How to Mend the Problem:  If you find physical travel is ahead for you, tend to mending any faults with your personal vehicle if you plan to use it.  Plan your trip to the best of your ability to minimise delays at airports and reduce travel times by taking the most direct but safest routes.  If you are called to go on a spiritual journey, it is always wise to first meet and form a relationship with your Spirit Guardian and animal if you have not done already.  Again, you must prepare for the journey.  And, if your journey is an emotional one, prepare yourself by committing yourself to being courageous… use talismans to this effect, if you feel necessary, and know that you will be deeply affected, however, it is a necessary journey to lay to rest the thing[s] which trouble your heart most.

the Chariot
Shadowscapes The Chariot ~ photo by i.macy

The tarot card I find is most relatable is The Chariot.  Notice, no matter which deck you use, the Warrior is upright, brave, and victorious.  He/she holds no reins… he is in control through the strength of his will and mind.  Although her beasts are pulling in different directions [in my case, a pair of Unicorns lead the way in my Shadowscapes deck], the charioteer uses her willpower and sheer resolve to steer the chariot forward in the direction she wants.  This is exactly what you wish to do in your journey as well.

You can catch up the first sixteen blogs, Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, Part Five, Part Six, Part Seven, Part Eight, Part Nine, Part Ten, Part Eleven, Part Twelve, Part Thirteen, Part Fourteen, Part Fifteen, and Part Sixteen by clicking on these respectively.

Many thanks for reading my blog.  Warmest blessings to those whom this way wander x

Sources

The Celtic Tree Oracle, by Liz and Colin Murray

What’s Your Birth Tree is the New What’s Your Star Sign, by Isabella

The Magickal Gorse Tree

By Isabella @TheWandCarver

Instagram: @thewandcarver

Gorse Ogham Onn
Gorse Ogham

I have been saving Gorse for Spring. Yes, I am a week early but I have other plans for that day. Gorse is an ogham tree, but not a Celtic Birth Tree. It is the symbol of the Spring Equinox… the beginning of Ostara/Eostra. Gorse is the second vowel of the ogham and it is called “onn”. There are several folk names for Gorse, but it seems “Furze” is most predominately used. It is a perennial evergreen shrub belonging to the pea family. It forms a much-branched, stunted shrub usually no taller than six feet high, therefore, I almost want to call it an ogham shrub, but it is still considered a tree. The plant’s thorns and its dense habit make Gorse/ Furze an excellent hedging plant. It can also be used as a barrier to protect young tree seedlings in coppices. The thorny nature of the plant means that it is often viewed as having protective powers. In Wales, it was said to guard against witches. The flowers are a deep yellow and have a pungent coconut scent. Although the main flowering period is from March to August, flowers can be found on bushes throughout the year. This lengthy flowering led to the country saying: when the Gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of fashion.

Gorse9AW
healingherbs.co.uk

As well as its use as a hedging material, furze was traditionally gathered into faggots and used as tinder to start fires. In 1864 it was cultivated in Surrey and other English counties especially for this purpose, being popular with bakers to whom it was sold as fuel for their ovens. The bark and flowers produce a fine yellow dye. In Eire the flowers were also used to flavour and add colour to whiskey and the Danes were reputed to use them to make beer. They can also be used to make wine and tea. Flower buds collected and potted with a blade of mace and some peppercorns, in white wine vinegar and salt solution, make a fine pickle.

[Nicholas] Culpepper states in his Herbal, that Gorse was good to open obstructions of the liver and spleen.

A decoction made with the flowers therof hath been found effectual against the jaundice and also to provoke urine, cleanse the kidneys from gravel or stone ingendered in them.”

Nicholas Culpeper was a seventeenth-century English botanist, herbalist, physician, and astrologer. Published over 350 years ago as a practical health guide, The Complete Herbal (1653), is still the most complete and definitive herbal available today. It contains a rich store of pharmaceutical and herbal knowledge, including herbs and where to find them, herb preparation, plasters, and much more.

Medicinal properties:
There is a Bach Flower Remedy that is given to the hopeless, those who feel they are beyond help or suffer a serious illness. “Greenman Essence of Gorse” helps ease frustration, restlessness, and jealousy, and helps promote emotional security and a feeling of deep inner joy.   Edward Bach was an English homoeopath in the 1930s.

Gorse flowers are high in protein and can be eaten raw in salads, made into fruit tea, cordial or syrup. It adds extra flavour and colour to beer, wine or spirits, and a whole range of sweet delights like chocolate and ice cream. The buds can be pickled in vinegar and eaten like capers. Don’t overeat! The plant contains slightly toxic alkaloids.

Gorse has surprisingly few medicinal uses, though its flowers have been used in the treatment of jaundice, scarlet fever, diarrhoea and kidney stones.

Magickal properties:
Herb of Love, Protection against evil. Restoration of Faith, Hope and Optimism. Gathering of Strength. It also attracts gold, so it is used in money spells.

Associated with love, protection, romance, and weddings. Used to further the romance of a consensual relationship. Protects against negativity and dark magick.

Carve the name “Gorse” into a gold or yellow candle. Face east, light the candle, and meditate on the light. Ask for protection, money, love, whatever it has to offer that you desire

In Wales hedges of the prickly gorse are used to protect the home against fairies, who cannot penetrate the hedge.

Correspondences:
Planet: Mercury, The Sun
Element: Fire
Colour: Yellow and Gold
Bird: Cormorant, Harrier Hawk
Stone: Topaz
Deity: Lugh, Celtic God of light and genius
Folk Names: Broom, Frey, Furze, Gorst, Goss, Prickly Broom, Ruffett, Whin

Thy yellow blooms – oh, they to me Are gold and sunshine blent together – Moses Teggart 1908

Many thanks for reading and warmest blessings to all whom this way wander x

Sources:

Culpeper’s English Physician: And Complete Herbal (Classic Reprint) by Nicholas Culpepper

The Bach Flower Remedies, by Edward Bach, 1998 reprint

Druidry.org

Wikipedia.org